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Visit

 

 

About Bangkok

 


Bangkok (English pronunciation: /ˈbæŋkɒk/[5]) is the capital and most populous city of Thailand. It is known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon (กรุงเทพมหานคร, pronounced [krūŋ tʰêːp mahǎː nákʰɔ̄ːn] ( listen)) or simply Krung Thep ( listen (help·info)). The city occupies 1,568.7 square kilometres (605.7 sq mi) in the Chao Phraya River delta in Central Thailand, and has a population of over 8 million, or 12.6 percent of the country's population. Over 14 million people (22.2 percent) live within the surrounding Bangkok Metropolitan Region, making Bangkok an extreme primate city, significantly dwarfing Thailand's other urban centres in terms of importance.

Bangkok traces its roots to a small trading post during the Ayutthaya Kingdom in the 15th century, which eventually grew and became the site of two capital cities: Thonburi in 1768 and Rattanakosin in 1782. Bangkok was at the heart of the modernization of Siam—later renamed Thailand—during the late 19th century, as the country faced pressures from the West. The city was at the centre of Thailand's political struggles throughout the 20th century, as the country abolished absolute monarchy, adopted constitutional rule and underwent numerous coups and several uprisings. The city grew rapidly during the 1960s through the 1980s and now exerts a significant impact on Thailand's politics, economy, education, media and modern society.


 

By plane

Bangkok is served by two airports: Suvarnabhumi Airport and Don Muang Airport. Suvarnabhumi Airport is used by all airlines in Thailand except for Nok Air, Orient Thai and Air Asia, which use the old Don Muang Airport. Both these airports are about 30 km (19 mi) from the city centre, so be prepared for a long ride to get into the city. Also allow at least three hours to connect between them, as they are far away from each other and there is heavy congestion on the roads. However, if you arrive at one of these and have a flight within a few hours from the other, then there is a free shuttle bus service which uses the tollways. You need to show your ticket to get on board.

Central Thailand

If you want to get out of the city for a while, there are plenty of day trip options from Bangkok.
Amphawa — interesting floating markets popular with the locals
Ayutthaya — ancient capital showcasing its many ruins, 1.5 hours away by bus or train
Bang Pa-In — its magnificent Summer Palace makes for a pleasant day trip
Damnoen Saduak — picture-perfect floating market on tourist steroids
Hua Hin — beach resort town with nearby waterfalls and national parks
Kanchanaburi — the famous Bridge over the River Kwai, the Erawan Falls and Hellfire Pass
Ko Kret — rustic little island to the north of Bangkok reknowned for its potteries, a pleasant day trip out of the concrete jungle
Nakhon Pathom — Thailand's oldest city and site of the world's largest stupa
Phetchaburi — relaxed historic town with the Khao Wang mountain, colourful temples and delicious desserts

Food and Water

As elsewhere in Thailand, be careful with what you eat. Outside of major tourist hotels and resorts, stay away from raw leafy vegetables, egg-based dressings like mayonnaise, unpackaged ice cream and minced meat as hot weather tends to make food go bad faster. In short, stick to boiled, baked, fried or peeled food.
Tap water in Bangkok is said to be safe when it comes out the plant, but unfortunately the plumbing along the way often is not, so it's wise to avoid drinking the stuff, even in hotels. Any water served to you in good restaurants will at least be boiled, but it's better to order sealed bottles instead, which are available everywhere at low prices.
In some areas, like the smaller sois surrounding Khao San Road, there are coin-operated filtration machines, allowing you to refill your drink bottles with safe water. These vending machines are often seen being used by locals, so they should be relatively safe.
Take care with ice, which may be made with tap water of questionable potability as above. Some residents claim that ice with round holes is made by commercial ice makers who purify their water; others state that it is wise not to rely on that claim.
 

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